Author Topic: More 1st hand observations...  (Read 505 times)

Offline AKA_Knutsac

  • AKA_Wardogs
  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 40
    • View Profile
More 1st hand observations...
« on: December 08, 2013, 08:15:42 am »
Following on Blasto's posts, I'll share some of the first hand observations I've collected.  I started doing this a few months ago to confirm or refute the sim's graphics (ie. throw gas on the ATAG forum pissing contests) and help inform TF in their work.  I limited my collection to accounts that were written during or soon after the BoB, no decades old recollections of the men.  First installments relate to visability...

Atmosphere

“It was a typical summer’s day as we took off and climbed away south.  The sun caught the haze below, making it difficult to see the ground.”  (“Spitfire: The experiences of a Battle of Britain fighter pilot” by Brian Lane; 1942; Pg 68)

“Thick haze persisted up to 5,000 feet, and although visibility above it was good, the ground was nearly invisible and the low sun made conditions worse.  The only features of the landscape we could identify from our altitude were lakes and rivers…”  (“Fighter Pilot” by Paul Richey; 1941; Pg 76)

“Soon we saw it – a speck against the haze miles away to the right, lower than us…”  (“Fighter Pilot” by Paul Richey; 1941; Pg 76)

“I found it – about five miles away to the right and below me.  I couldn’t see what it was, but it stood out clearly against the top of the haze…”  (“Fighter Pilot” by Paul Richey; 1941; Pg 86)

Reflections and Camouflage

“We circled and climbed away south-east, the sun shining and glinting on our wings.”  (“Spitfire: The experiences of a Battle of Britain fighter pilot” by Brian Lane; 1942; Pg 33)

“Above us was the deep blue dome of the heavens.  Anxiously we scanned it, looking for the tell-tale glint of the sun on a pair of wings which would show us the enemy was above.”  (“Spitfire: The experiences of a Battle of Britain fighter pilot” by Brian Lane; 1942; Pg 36)

“As we neared him he began to turn and twist this way and that, the sun catching the dark green camouflage and the black crosses on his wings.”  (“Spitfire: The experiences of a Battle of Britain fighter pilot” by Brian Lane; 1942; Pg 37)

“At 17,000 feet we were over the outskirts of the Metropolis, still climbing, and watching the sun for any tell-tale glints which would tell of enemy fighters.”  (“Spitfire: The experiences of a Battle of Britain fighter pilot” by Brian Lane; 1942; Pg 68)

“Looking in the direction indicated, I saw some gleaming specks a mile or two ahead and two or three thousand feet above us…[t]he specks grew larger and resolved themselves into Me 109’s, their yellow painted noses shining golden in the sunlight.”  (“Spitfire: The experiences of a Battle of Britain fighter pilot” by Brian Lane; 1942; Pg 68)

“Above me the flash of the sun on wings told of a dog-fight going on.  No doubt the fighter escort and the rest of the Spitfires, but of what must have been over 50 bombers not one could I see!  Nor could I see the rest of the flight, much less the Squadron!”  (“Spitfire: The experiences of a Battle of Britain fighter pilot” by Brian Lane; 1942; Pg 75-76)

“I kept glancing up at those white trails just above, a gleaming speck at the head of each showing the fighters themselves.”  (“Spitfire: The experiences of a Battle of Britain fighter pilot” by Brian Lane; 1942; Pg 81)

“…and pointed to the small but clearly visible outline of a Ju 88, its duck-egg blue underside glinting against the deeper blue of the sky.  ‘Twenty thousand, I’d say…’”   (“Fighter Pilot” by Paul Richey; 1941; Pg 62)

“By this time, however, we had lost sight of Reds as they had a slight lead, and their camouflage soon merged into the terrain below.”  (“Ten Fighter Boys”; 1942; Pg 31)

“I daren’t look round and see if anything is following me, because I knew if I took my eyes off him for a second, he would disappear.  Somehow or other, they always do against the water.”  (“Ten Fighter Boys”; 1942; Pg 161)

“The sky was clear above the sun shining down from the blue of the heavens on the dazzling layer of cloud 10,000 feet below us, the Dorniers standing out starkly black against the snowy whiteness.”  (“Spitfire: The experiences of a Battle of Britain fighter pilot” by Brian Lane; 1942; 2, Pg 79)

“After a lot of neck-craning and squinting we saw it – a Dornier 17 immediately above us at some 20,000 feet…and just visible in the thinner clouds.  Like all Luftwaffe aircraft it was light-blue underneath and difficult to spot.”  (“Fighter Pilot” by Paul Richey; 1941; Pg 33)

“The camouflaged 109s were difficult to pick up against the grey background of the sea and it was a moment or two before I could locate them.”  (“Nine Lives” by Alan Deere; 1959;Pg 98)

“Well away from the airfield, and hugging the tree tops to make best of my camouflaged aircraft, I waited for silent guns at Manston to signify the all clear.”  (“Nine Lives” by Alan Deere; 1959;Pg 122)

 â€œâ€¦when I broke off my attacks I headed for home at full speed, hugging the tree tops to take full advantage of my camouflaged Spitfire.”  (“Nine Lives” by Alan Deere; 1959;Pg 226)